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Have you ever been part of a group project in school? Were you unfortunately assigned to work with the laziest people in class? It won’t come as a surprise if you ended up doing the whole entire project on your own. The truth is, you were taken advantage of. The workplace also has its fair share of people who will take advantage of you. As a career network, Akhtaboot is here to share with you the types of employees who might take advantage of you, and how you should respond to each one:

The Employee Who Pretends To Be “Drowning” With Work

You’re sitting at your desk and an employee approaches you and asks if you can help them wrap up a PowerPoint presentation, because they’re just drowning with work. The next thing you know they’re out on a lunch break and you’re multi-tasking as well as trying to find the time to complete their work for them.

Here’s how you should respond:

The next time an employee tries to throw their work at you, tell them you’ll offer help when your schedule clears up. Do not postpone working on your own tasks and risk lagging behind on your work. Not only have you lost the time that you could have used to complete your work, but you’ve agreed to do someone else’s work when they’re clearly not as busy as they claimed to be. The next thing you know, you will be drowning with work, and you will be the one asking other employees for help!

The New Employee

It’s the start of a new week, and a new employee has joined your team. After a few days this employee approaches you and asks you for help. Knowing that this employee is still trying to figure out how things are done around in the office, you help them with a specific task. The next thing you know, this employee is approaching you whenever they’re given a new task.

Here’s how you should respond:

Show this employee the criteria that will help them get the task done, but don’t complete it for them. Give them some useful guidelines that will help them throughout their task. If you feel like you aren’t able to offer much help, refer them to another co-worker. You can also opt to help the new employee with additional tips and guidelines after your working hours.

The Victimized Employee

It’s only natural to empathize with the employee who’s always victimized by their superior. This mistreated employee will approach you in ‘’their time of need’’ and use their problems as a weapon to make you feel bad for them. This employee might ask you to take over a task for them, in order to avoid being criticized by their superior.

Here’s how you should respond:

Tell them that you empathize with their situation, but you can’t take over the task for them. Offer them advice and give them tips that could help them improve their work. This will allow them to see how tough times will allow them to grow and learn from their mistakes. If they ask others to do their work just to avoid being “criticized” then they will constantly encounter mountains of obstacles, and never find the courage to overcome them.

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